Upcoming Speaking Events

I will be the inaugural speaker for the Northern Colorado Database Professionals on September 17, in Loveland, CO. I will be presenting a preview version of my PASS Summit 2012 session about how to migrate to SQL Server 2012. The abstract is below:

Migrating to SQL Server 2012
How do you design and implement a safe and successful migration from an older
version of SQL Server to SQL Server 2012, with no data loss and virtually no
downtime? What if you have a limited hardware budget for the upgrade effort, and
you are worried about the new core-based licensing in SQL Server 2012? How can
you choose your hardware wisely in light of the new licensing model?
This session will cover several different methods for migrating your
data to SQL Server 2012 while meeting these objectives and minimizing your
hardware and licensing costs. You will also learn how to help make the case that
an upgrade makes good sense from a business perspective.

 

The following week, I will be at SQLSaturday #169 on September 22, in Denver, CO. I will be presenting an updated version of DMV Emergency Room!, about how to use a special set of DMV queries to help identify and troubleshoot performance issues in an emergency. The abstract is below:

DMV Emergency Room!

If you have ever been responsible for a mission critical database, you have probably been faced with a high stress, emergency situation where a database issue is causing unacceptable application performance, resulting in angry users and hovering managers and executives. If this hasn’t happened to you yet, thank your lucky stars, but start getting prepared for your time in the hot seat. This session will show you how to use DMV queries to quickly detect and diagnose the problem, starting at the server and instance level, and then progressing down to the database and object level. Based on the initial assessment of the problem, different types of DMV queries will help you narrow down and identify the problem. This session will show you how to assemble and use an emergency DMV toolkit that you can use to save the day the next time a sick database shows up on your watch in the Database ER!

 

On October 13, 2012, I will be at SQLSaturday #145 in Nashville, TN. I will be presenting Hardware 301: A deeper Dive into Database Hardware. The abstract is below:

Hardware 301: Diving Deeper into Database Hardware

Making the right hardware selection decisions is extremely important for database scalability. Having properly sized and configured hardware can both increase application performance and reduce capital expenses dramatically. Unfortunately, there are so many different choices and options available when it comes to selecting hardware and storage subsystems, it is very easy to make bad choices based on outmoded conventional wisdom. This session will give you a framework for how to pick the right hardware and storage subsystem for your workload type. You will learn how to evaluate and compare key hardware components, such as processors, chipsets, and memory.

 

 

Finally, I will be speaking at the PASS Summit 2012 during the week of Nov 6-9, 2012, in Seattle, WA.  The abstract for this session is shown below:

Migrating to SQL Server 2012

How do you design and implement a safe and successful migration from an older version of SQL Server to SQL Server 2012, with no data loss and virtually no downtime? What if you have a limited hardware budget for the upgrade effort, and you are worried about the new core-based licensing in SQL Server 2012? How can you choose your hardware wisely in light of the new licensing model?  This session will cover several different methods for migrating your data to SQL Server 2012 while meeting these objectives and minimizing your hardware and licensing costs. You will also learn how to help make the case that an upgrade makes good sense from a business perspective.

All three of these events should be a lot of fun, and I am looking forward to seeing a lot of people at the venues!

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3 Responses to Upcoming Speaking Events

  1. Stephen says:

    Hi Glenn.
    Any chance you can share the “Migrating to SQL Server 2012″ deck with the likes of us who are 900+ miles away (and have ZERO budget for PASS)…? I’m on the cusp of migrating from SQL2005EE to SQL2012EE – September end, most likely, and my last migration was 3 years ago from SQL2000 to 2008 (previous gig). There are bound to be several things I never thought of… ;-)

    Also, with great interest and appreciation, I’ve been reading your posts on hardware for SQL Server and have just contracted for a decent box based on your and Brent Ozar’s input (from blogs). Does this box sound reasonable to you – IO is our issue, not cycles and GHz?
    Active-passive cluster
    ● Operating System:Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition 64-Bit (Licensed for 1 Processor)
    ● Processor:Single Processor, Hex Core Intel 2.50GHz – Dell R720 chassis
    ● Memory:128 GB
    ● Drive and RAID Configuration:
    ○ RAID 1 [SKU: 102000]
    ○ 300 GB Std. (15K SAS 3.5″) – Qty: 2
    ○ C: drive
    ● Network:1000 Mbps
    ● External Storage Connection(s):6Gbps HA DAS Connection (Dell MD3200)
    ○ 146GB SFF 15K RPM (6Gb/s) 2.5″ – Qty: 8 RAID 10 for user mdf’s – 540GB
    ○ 146GB SFF 15K RPM (6Gb/s) 2.5″ – Qty: 6 RAID 10 for user ldf’s – 400GB
    ○ 146GB SFF 15K RPM (6Gb/s) 2.5″ – Qty: 6 RAID 10 for tempdb – 400GB
    ○ 146GB SFF 15K RPM (6Gb/s) 2.5″ – Qty: 3 RAID 5 for backups – 130GB
    ○ 146GB SFF 15K RPM (6Gb/s) 2.5″ – Qty: 1 Hotspare
    ● MS SQL 2012 Enterprise Edition – 1x 6 Core (3 x 2-packs)

    Sincerely hoping it rips! Aim is to have all page-compressed DB’s in memory at once to minimize physical read IO (over 75% read vs. write). Testing shows we can get our 350+GB into 80GB compressed and even with lower RAM SQL2012 rips through the calculations.

    Though we’ve never met, I really appreciate your sharing so much via your blog et al.

    Best regards.

    • Glenn Berry says:

      Hey Stephen,

      I will eventually post a copy of my deck on my blog. Regarding your hardware configuraton, it sounds like you are considering the 2.5GHz, six core Xeon E5-2640. You might want to take a look at the 2.9GHz, six core Xeon E5-2667 instead (budget permitting). It has a higher clock speed and more memory bandwidth. You also might consider getting twelve 16GB sticks of RAM (for 192GB total). You can buy 16GB sticks of RAM from Crucial for quite a bit less than what Dell charges, although your Dell rep may give you a good price when you but two new R720 servers. Finally, how much are you using TemoDB for your workload? Using six spindles might be too much, maybe you could go down to four spindles? Or, maybe you could get a couple of SSDs in RAID 1, for TempDB.

      Glenn

      • Stephen says:

        Sorry for the delay, Glenn, I had erroneously thought that your reply might appear in my RSS feed…

        Thanks for the pointers on the hardware. We’re hosted at Rackspace so are at the mercies of their procurement process. I already hit a number of “Non Standard” configuration issues that significantly bumped the cost, hence resorting to 2.5″ drives instead of 3.5″ and using all 24 slots in the MD3200 and taking the 2.5GHz processor. We’re horribly IO bound and only run at sub-20% on 16 CPUs now, so it wasn’t imperative that I go for a screaming CPU. I was “warned” by Rackspace that bumping the CPU GHz will be more expensive and, having already overshot my additional 2K/month budget by $700, discretion ruled. BTW, the $700 extra is purely 1 additional 2-core SQL2012EE license (thanks Microsoft!).

        We use tempdb a lot! Not deliberately, by explicitly creating and dropping #tables, but our calcs use generated T-SQL that can involve 15 or more CTEs nested to reflect formula levels, so tempdb gets hit with all the interims. That should change with the new box as the 128GB RAM should contain all our databases and have 30GB to spare for SQL to use before spilling to tempdb (I hope!). I also came across an issue where we gobbled up 240GB of tempdb by rows awaiting the ghost process’s cleanup after deleting many, many millions of rows from two tables – we almost died (within 20GB of no space on the drive). Hence I’m a bit gun shy in case 2012 shows no improvement in this aspect over 2005. With 400GB for purely tempdb, I think I’m safe. Dropping to a 4-disk RAID-10 only gave a tad over the 240GB I’d just seen, so I felt it was dangerously low. I’d read elsewhere that RAID-10 should be used for tempdb, but you suggest RAID-1 – can you elucidate on that, please?

        Budget prohibited SSD’s, too, which I dearly wanted but had to let go this time around. Next rev (2 years away) will see another bump in RAM and probably higher GHz CPU.

        We just were asked to estimate the impact of a customer coming on who has twice the current number of metered points than our entire customer base. Methinks my “free” RAM will be shrinking quite quickly.

        Thanks in advance for the deck – I eagerly await it so I can put together a meaningful transition plan.

        Best regards,

        Stephen

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