SQL Server 2008 and 2008R2 Diagnostic Information Queries

Since SQL Server 2008 R2 has gone RTM, and will be available on MSDN Subscribers on May 3, I thought it was time to post an updated version of the Diagnostic Information queries. This has updated build lists for SQL Server 2008, SQL Azure, and SQL Server 2008 R2, and a few other minor tweaks.

I am also going to make a special limited time offer here, where I will interpret the results of these queries (for free) for the first 20 people who run them, and save the results in Excel, and send them back to me.  This would be for one SQL instance and one database per person. In order to avoid getting spammed, I am doing to have to make you jump through a couple of hoops to do this…

First, you need to download the preformatted spreadsheet that I have saved here on SkyDrive. You need to save the results of each query (by right-clicking on the top left square of the results grid and selecting “Copy with Headers”), and pasting them into the correct tab of the spreadsheet.  Make sure to edit out anything you don’t want me to see. Then, when you are done, save the spreadsheet with your name in the filename.

Then, you need to follow me on Twitter, where I am  http://twitter.com/GlennAlanBerry. Then send me a tweet saying hello and that you want me to take a look at your results. I will follow you, and send you a Direct Message (DM) with my email address. Finally, you send me your results by e-mail, I look at them, add my comments, and send them back to you. I will not spam you or contact you after I send the results, unless you contact me first. BTW, this is only for SQL Server 2008 or 2008 R2, not for SQL Server 2005.

There are some other caveats here. First, you need to have VIEW SERVER STATE permission on the database instance that you want to run these queries on. Second, these queries are “as is, with no warranty express or implied”. As Buck Woody (blog | twitter) says, make sure you understand and test any scripts or queries you get from the Internet.  These queries are all SELECT queries, and they will not affect or impact your server, but that is up to you to decide and verify.

Finally, since I am doing this as a free community service, I am not liable for what happens if you decide to implement any suggestions or changes that I suggest when I interpret your results. It is up to you to decide whether you want to make any changes, and it is up to you to test any changes you decide to make. 

So, If I have not scared you off, feel free to take advantage of this offer. Operators are standing by!

-- SQL Server 2008 and R2 Diagnostic Information Queries
-- Glenn Berry 
-- April 2010
-- http://glennberrysqlperformance.spaces.live.com/
-- Twitter: GlennAlanBerry

-- Instance level queries *******************************

-- SQL and OS Version information for current instance
SELECT @@VERSION AS [SQL Version Info];

-- SQL Server 2008 RTM is considered an "unsupported service pack" 
-- as of April 13, 2010
-- SQL Server 2008 RTM Builds     SQL Server 2008 SP1 Builds
-- Build       Description        Build        Description
-- 1600        Gold RTM
-- 1763        RTM CU1
-- 1779        RTM CU2
-- 1787        RTM CU3    -->      2531        SP1 RTM
-- 1798        RTM CU4    -->      2710        SP1 CU1
-- 1806        RTM CU5    -->      2714        SP1 CU2 
-- 1812        RTM CU6    -->      2723        SP1 CU3
-- 1818        RTM CU7    -->      2734        SP1 CU4
-- 1823        RTM CU8    -->      2746        SP1 CU5
-- 1828        RTM CU9    -->      2757        SP1 CU6
-- 1835        RTM CU10   -->      2766        SP1 CU7

-- SQL Azure Builds (most DMV queries don't work on SQL Azure)
-- Build            Description
-- 10.25.9200       RTM Service Update 1
-- 10.25.9268       RTM Service Update 2

-- SQL Server 2008 R2 Builds
-- Build            Description
-- 10.50.1092        August 2009 CTP2
-- 10.50.1352        November 2009 CTP3
-- 10.50.1450        Release Candidate
-- 10.50.1600        RTM



-- Hardware information from SQL Server 2008 
-- (Cannot distinguish between HT and multi-core)
SELECT cpu_count AS [Logical CPU Count], hyperthread_ratio AS [Hyperthread Ratio],
cpu_count/hyperthread_ratio AS [Physical CPU Count], 
physical_memory_in_bytes/1048576 AS [Physical Memory (MB)], sqlserver_start_time
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info;


-- Get sp_configure values for instance
EXEC sp_configure 'Show Advanced Options', 1;
GO
RECONFIGURE;
GO
EXEC sp_configure;

-- Focus on
-- backup compression default
-- clr enabled (only enable if it is needed)
-- lightweight pooling (should be zero)
-- max degree of parallelism 
-- max server memory (MB) (set to an appropriate value)
-- optimize for ad hoc workloads (should be 1)
-- priority boost (should be zero)


-- File Names and Paths for TempDB and all user databases in instance 
SELECT DB_NAME([database_id])AS [Database Name], [file_id], 
       name, physical_name, type_desc
FROM sys.master_files
WHERE [database_id] > 4 AND [database_id] <> 32767
OR [database_id] = 2;

-- Things to look at:
-- Are data files and log files on different drives?
-- Is everything on the C: drive?
-- Is TempDB on dedicated drives?
-- Are there multiple data files?


-- Calculates average stalls per read, per write, and per total input/output for each database file. 
SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS [Database Name], file_id ,io_stall_read_ms, num_of_reads,
CAST(io_stall_read_ms/(1.0 + num_of_reads) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_read_stall_ms],io_stall_write_ms, 
num_of_writes,CAST(io_stall_write_ms/(1.0+num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) AS [avg_write_stall_ms],
io_stall_read_ms + io_stall_write_ms AS [io_stalls], num_of_reads + num_of_writes AS [total_io],
CAST((io_stall_read_ms + io_stall_write_ms)/(1.0 + num_of_reads + num_of_writes) AS NUMERIC(10,1)) 
AS [avg_io_stall_ms]
FROM sys.dm_io_virtual_file_stats(null,null)
ORDER BY avg_io_stall_ms DESC;

-- Helps determine which database files on the entire instance have the most I/O bottlenecks


-- Recovery model, log reuse wait description, log file size, log usage size 
-- and compatibility level for all databases on instance
SELECT db.[name] AS [Database Name], db.recovery_model_desc AS [Recovery Model], 
db.log_reuse_wait_desc AS [Log Reuse Wait Description], 
ls.cntr_value AS [Log Size (KB)], lu.cntr_value AS [Log Used (KB)],
CAST(CAST(lu.cntr_value AS FLOAT) / CAST(ls.cntr_value AS FLOAT)AS DECIMAL(18,2)) * 100 AS [Log Used %], 
db.[compatibility_level] AS [DB Compatibility Level], db.page_verify_option_desc AS [Page Verify Option]
FROM sys.databases AS db
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS lu 
ON db.name = lu.instance_name
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_performance_counters AS ls 
ON db.name = ls.instance_name
WHERE lu.counter_name LIKE 'Log File(s) Used Size (KB)%' 
AND ls.counter_name LIKE 'Log File(s) Size (KB)%';

-- Things to look at
-- How many databases are on the instance?
-- What recovery models are they using?
-- What is the log reuse wait description?
-- How full are the transaction logs ?
-- What compatibility level are they on?


-- Clear Wait Stats 
-- DBCC SQLPERF('sys.dm_os_wait_stats', CLEAR);

-- Isolate top waits for server instance since last restart or statistics clear
WITH Waits AS
(SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms / 1000. AS wait_time_s,
100. * wait_time_ms / SUM(wait_time_ms) OVER() AS pct,
ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS rn
FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats
WHERE wait_type NOT IN ('CLR_SEMAPHORE','LAZYWRITER_SLEEP','RESOURCE_QUEUE','SLEEP_TASK'
,'SLEEP_SYSTEMTASK','SQLTRACE_BUFFER_FLUSH','WAITFOR', 'LOGMGR_QUEUE','CHECKPOINT_QUEUE'
,'REQUEST_FOR_DEADLOCK_SEARCH','XE_TIMER_EVENT','BROKER_TO_FLUSH','BROKER_TASK_STOP','CLR_MANUAL_EVENT'
,'CLR_AUTO_EVENT','DISPATCHER_QUEUE_SEMAPHORE', 'FT_IFTS_SCHEDULER_IDLE_WAIT'
,'XE_DISPATCHER_WAIT', 'XE_DISPATCHER_JOIN'))
SELECT W1.wait_type, 
CAST(W1.wait_time_s AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS wait_time_s,
CAST(W1.pct AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS pct,
CAST(SUM(W2.pct) AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS running_pct
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.rn <= W1.rn
GROUP BY W1.rn, W1.wait_type, W1.wait_time_s, W1.pct
HAVING SUM(W2.pct) - W1.pct < 95; -- percentage threshold

-- Common Significant Wait types with BOL explanations

-- *** Network Related Waits ***
-- ASYNC_NETWORK_IO        Occurs on network writes when the task is blocked behind the network

-- *** Locking Waits ***
-- LCK_M_IX                Occurs when a task is waiting to acquire an Intent Exclusive (IX) lock
-- LCK_M_IU                Occurs when a task is waiting to acquire an Intent Update (IU) lock
-- LCK_M_S                Occurs when a task is waiting to acquire a Shared lock

-- *** I/O Related Waits ***
-- ASYNC_IO_COMPLETION  Occurs when a task is waiting for I/Os to finish
-- IO_COMPLETION        Occurs while waiting for I/O operations to complete. 
--                      This wait type generally represents non-data page I/Os. Data page I/O completion waits appear 
--                      as PAGEIOLATCH_* waits
-- PAGEIOLATCH_SH        Occurs when a task is waiting on a latch for a buffer that is in an I/O request. 
--                      The latch request is in Shared mode. Long waits may indicate problems with the disk subsystem.
-- PAGEIOLATCH_EX        Occurs when a task is waiting on a latch for a buffer that is in an I/O request. 
--                      The latch request is in Exclusive mode. Long waits may indicate problems with the disk subsystem.
-- WRITELOG             Occurs while waiting for a log flush to complete. 
--                      Common operations that cause log flushes are checkpoints and transaction commits.
-- PAGELATCH_EX            Occurs when a task is waiting on a latch for a buffer that is not in an I/O request. 
--                      The latch request is in Exclusive mode.
-- BACKUPIO                Occurs when a backup task is waiting for data, or is waiting for a buffer in which to store data

-- *** CPU Related Waits ***
-- SOS_SCHEDULER_YIELD  Occurs when a task voluntarily yields the scheduler for other tasks to execute. 
--                      During this wait the task is waiting for its quantum to be renewed.

-- THREADPOOL            Occurs when a task is waiting for a worker to run on. 
--                      This can indicate that the maximum worker setting is too low, or that batch executions are taking 
--                      unusually long, thus reducing the number of workers available to satisfy other batches.
-- CX_PACKET            Occurs when trying to synchronize the query processor exchange iterator 
--                        You may consider lowering the degree of parallelism if contention on this wait type becomes a problem


-- Signal Waits for instance
SELECT CAST(100.0 * SUM(signal_wait_time_ms) / SUM (wait_time_ms) AS NUMERIC(20,2)) 
AS [%signal (cpu) waits],
CAST(100.0 * SUM(wait_time_ms - signal_wait_time_ms) / SUM (wait_time_ms) AS NUMERIC(20,2)) 
AS [%resource waits]
FROM sys.dm_os_wait_stats;

-- Signal Waits above 10-15% is usually a sign of CPU pressure


-- Get CPU Utilization History for last 30 minutes (in one minute intervals)
-- This version works with SQL Server 2008 and SQL Server 2008 R2 only
DECLARE @ts_now bigint = (SELECT cpu_ticks/(cpu_ticks/ms_ticks)FROM sys.dm_os_sys_info); 

SELECT TOP(30) SQLProcessUtilization AS [SQL Server Process CPU Utilization], 
               SystemIdle AS [System Idle Process], 
               100 - SystemIdle - SQLProcessUtilization AS [Other Process CPU Utilization], 
               DATEADD(ms, -1 * (@ts_now - [timestamp]), GETDATE()) AS [Event Time] 
FROM ( 
      SELECT record.value('(./Record/@id)[1]', 'int') AS record_id, 
            record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/SystemIdle)[1]', 'int') 
            AS [SystemIdle], 
            record.value('(./Record/SchedulerMonitorEvent/SystemHealth/ProcessUtilization)[1]', 
            'int') 
            AS [SQLProcessUtilization], [timestamp] 
      FROM ( 
            SELECT [timestamp], CONVERT(xml, record) AS [record] 
            FROM sys.dm_os_ring_buffers 
            WHERE ring_buffer_type = N'RING_BUFFER_SCHEDULER_MONITOR' 
            AND record LIKE '%<SystemHealth>%') AS x 
      ) AS y 
ORDER BY record_id DESC;


-- Good basic information about memory amounts and state
SELECT total_physical_memory_kb, available_physical_memory_kb, 
       total_page_file_kb, available_page_file_kb, 
       system_memory_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_os_sys_memory;


-- SQL Server Process Address space info 
--(shows whether locked pages is enabled, among other things)
SELECT physical_memory_in_use_kb,locked_page_allocations_kb, 
       page_fault_count, memory_utilization_percentage, 
       available_commit_limit_kb, process_physical_memory_low, 
       process_virtual_memory_low
FROM sys.dm_os_process_memory;


-- Page Life Expectancy (PLE) value for default instance
SELECT cntr_value AS [Page Life Expectancy]
FROM sys.dm_os_performance_counters
WHERE OBJECT_NAME = 'SQLServer:Buffer Manager' -- Modify this if you have named instances
AND counter_name = 'Page life expectancy';

-- PLE is a good measurement of memory pressure.
-- Higher PLE is better. Below 300 is generally bad.
-- Watch the trend, not the absolute value.



-- Memory Clerk Usage for instance
SELECT TOP(20) [type], [name], SUM(single_pages_kb) AS [SPA Mem, Kb] 
FROM sys.dm_os_memory_clerks 
GROUP BY [type], [name]  
ORDER BY SUM(single_pages_kb) DESC;

-- CACHESTORE_SQLCP  SQL Plans         - These are cached SQL statements or batches that aren't in 
--                                     stored procedures, functions and triggers
-- CACHESTORE_OBJCP  Object Plans      - These are compiled plans for stored procedures, 
--                                     functions and triggers
-- CACHESTORE_PHDR   Algebrizer Trees  - An algebrizer tree is the parsed SQL text that 
--                                     resolves the table and column names


-- Find single-use, ad-hoc queries that are bloating the plan cache
SELECT TOP(100) [text], cp.size_in_bytes
FROM sys.dm_exec_cached_plans AS cp
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(plan_handle) 
WHERE cp.cacheobjtype = 'Compiled Plan' 
AND cp.objtype = 'Adhoc' 
AND cp.usecounts = 1
ORDER BY cp.size_in_bytes DESC;

-- Gives you the text and size of single-use ad-hoc queries that waste space in plan cache
-- Enabling 'optimize for ad hoc workloads' for the instance can help (SQL Server 2008 only)
-- Enabling forced parameterization for the database can help


-- Database specific queries *****************************************************************

-- Switch to a user database
USE YourDatabaseName;
GO

-- Individual File Sizes and space available for current database
SELECT name AS [File Name] , physical_name AS [Physical Name], size/128.0 AS [Total Size in MB],
size/128.0 - CAST(FILEPROPERTY(name, 'SpaceUsed') AS int)/128.0 AS [Available Space In MB]
FROM sys.database_files;

-- Look at how large and how full the files are and where they are located
-- Make sure the transaction log is not full!!


-- Top Cached SPs By Execution Count (SQL 2008)
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Second, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Second],
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime],  
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time],
qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.execution_count DESC;

-- Top Cached SPs By Total Worker time (SQL 2008). Worker time relates to CPU cost
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_worker_time AS [TotalWorkerTime], 
qs.total_worker_time/qs.execution_count AS [AvgWorkerTime], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Second, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Second],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count 
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_worker_time DESC;

-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Reads (SQL 2008). Logical reads relate to memory pressure
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_reads AS [TotalLogicalReads], 
qs.total_logical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalReads],qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Second, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Second], 
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count 
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_reads DESC;

-- Top Cached SPs By Total Physical Reads (SQL 2008). Physical reads relate to disk I/O pressure
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name],qs.total_physical_reads AS [TotalPhysicalReads], 
qs.total_physical_reads/qs.execution_count AS [AvgPhysicalReads], qs.execution_count, 
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Second, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Second],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count 
AS [avg_elapsed_time], qs.cached_time 
FROM sys.procedures AS p
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_physical_reads DESC;
       
-- Top Cached SPs By Total Logical Writes (SQL 2008). 
-- Logical writes relate to both memory and disk I/O pressure 
SELECT TOP(25) p.name AS [SP Name], qs.total_logical_writes AS [TotalLogicalWrites], 
qs.total_logical_writes/qs.execution_count AS [AvgLogicalWrites], qs.execution_count,
ISNULL(qs.execution_count/DATEDIFF(Second, qs.cached_time, GETDATE()), 0) AS [Calls/Second],
qs.total_elapsed_time, qs.total_elapsed_time/qs.execution_count AS [avg_elapsed_time], 
qs.cached_time
FROM sys.procedures AS p
INNER JOIN sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats AS qs
ON p.[object_id] = qs.[object_id]
WHERE qs.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY qs.total_logical_writes DESC;


-- Lists the top statements by average input/output usage for the current database
SELECT TOP(50) OBJECT_NAME(qt.objectid) AS [SP Name],
(qs.total_logical_reads + qs.total_logical_writes) /qs.execution_count AS [Avg IO],
SUBSTRING(qt.[text],qs.statement_start_offset/2, 
    (CASE 
        WHEN qs.statement_end_offset = -1 
     THEN LEN(CONVERT(nvarchar(max), qt.[text])) * 2 
        ELSE qs.statement_end_offset 
     END - qs.statement_start_offset)/2) AS [Query Text]    
FROM sys.dm_exec_query_stats AS qs
CROSS APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) AS qt
WHERE qt.[dbid] = DB_ID()
ORDER BY [Avg IO] DESC;

-- Helps you find the most expensive statements for I/O by SP


-- Possible Bad NC Indexes (writes > reads)
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(s.[object_id]) AS [Table Name], i.name AS [Index Name], i.index_id,
user_updates AS [Total Writes], user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups AS [Total Reads],
user_updates - (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups) AS [Difference]
FROM sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS s WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.indexes AS i WITH (NOLOCK)
ON s.[object_id] = i.[object_id]
AND i.index_id = s.index_id
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY(s.[object_id],'IsUserTable') = 1
AND s.database_id = DB_ID()
AND user_updates > (user_seeks + user_scans + user_lookups)
AND i.index_id > 1
ORDER BY [Difference] DESC, [Total Writes] DESC, [Total Reads] ASC;

-- Consider your complete workload
-- Investigate further before dropping an index


-- Missing Indexes current database by Index Advantage
SELECT user_seeks * avg_total_user_cost * (avg_user_impact * 0.01) AS [index_advantage], 
migs.last_user_seek, mid.[statement] AS [Database.Schema.Table],
mid.equality_columns, mid.inequality_columns, mid.included_columns,
migs.unique_compiles, migs.user_seeks, migs.avg_total_user_cost, migs.avg_user_impact
FROM sys.dm_db_missing_index_group_stats AS migs WITH (NOLOCK)
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_groups AS mig WITH (NOLOCK)
ON migs.group_handle = mig.index_group_handle
INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_missing_index_details AS mid WITH (NOLOCK)
ON mig.index_handle = mid.index_handle
WHERE mid.database_id = DB_ID()
ORDER BY index_advantage DESC;

-- Look at last user seek time, number of user seeks to help determine source and importance
-- SQL Server is overly eager to add included columns, so beware


-- Breaks down buffers used by current database by object (table, index) in the buffer cache
SELECT OBJECT_NAME(p.[object_id]) AS [ObjectName], p.[object_id], 
p.index_id, COUNT(*)/128 AS [buffer size(MB)],  COUNT(*) AS [buffer_count] 
FROM sys.allocation_units AS a
INNER JOIN sys.dm_os_buffer_descriptors AS b
ON a.allocation_unit_id = b.allocation_unit_id
INNER JOIN sys.partitions AS p
ON a.container_id = p.hobt_id
WHERE b.database_id = DB_ID()
AND p.[object_id] > 100
GROUP BY p.[object_id], p.index_id
ORDER BY buffer_count DESC;

-- Tells you what tables and indexes are using the most memory in the buffer cache






About these ads
This entry was posted in SQL Server 2008 R2. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to SQL Server 2008 and 2008R2 Diagnostic Information Queries

  1. Unknown says:

    We need to switch the ARITHABORT and ANSI_WARNINGS as required prior to getting the Recovery Models [OFF] and CPU Utilization [ON]. While computing the Logused % there is a chance of Divide by Zero errors. Hence the two SET options are switched off so that a NULL is returned.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s